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Weather Alerts and Warnings

Heat Warnings
There are currently no heat warnings in effect.

Extreme heat events can put the public at risk of heat-related illnesses. Four environmental factors work together to make it hot enough to put health at risk. This includes high temperature, high relative humidity (moisture in the air), radiant heat (from the sun) and low wind speed (lack of air movement).  Additionally, an individual’s health can depend on their sensitivity, acclimatization and their own as well as their community’s adaptability to extreme heat.

The Haldimand-Norfolk Health Unit’s Medical Officer of Health issues a Heat Warning or an Extended Heat Warning upon notification from Environment Canada and Climate Change Canada that certain extreme heat thresholds have been met. Details for each warning and their triggers can be found below.

Heat Warning A Heat Warning will be issued when:

  • two consecutive days are forecasted to have a daytime high temperature of 31C or higher and a nighttime temperature of 20C or higher; or
  • two consecutive days are forecasted to have a humidex of 40C or higher.

Extended Heat Warning

An Extended Heat Warning will be issued when:

  • three or more consecutive days are forecasted to have a daytime high temperature of 31C or higher and a nighttime temperature of 20C or higher; or
  • three or more consecutive days are forecasted to have a humidex of 40C or higher.

Heat Affects Everybody.

Heat illnesses are preventable and knowing the risks and how to protect yourself and your family will keep you safe over the summer. Much like a fever, extreme heat stresses your body’s ability to maintain its normal temperature and can lead to a heat stroke. When out in the heat, watch for symptoms of heat illness, which include:

  • dizziness or fainting;
  • nausea or vomiting;
  • headache;
  • rapid breathing and heartbeat;
  • extreme thirst; and
  • decreased urination with unusually dark yellow urine.

If you experience any of these symptoms during extreme heat, immediately move to a cool place and drink liquids. Water is best. A list of heat-related illnesses and their symptoms can be found below from the Government of Canada website:

 

 

Health Effects

Causes and Signs


 
 
 
 
Heat Stroke The most serious type of heat illness is a result of body heat overload. Signs of heat stroke may include a core body temperature of more than 40C/104F, complete or partial loss of consciousness and/or reduced mental ability. Sweating is not a good indicator, as there are two types of heat stroke:

Classic – accompanied by little or no sweating, usually occurring in children, those who are chronically ill and older adults.

Exertional – accompanied by an increase in body temperature because of strenuous exercise or occupational exposure in combination with environmental heat, and where sweating is usually present.

Heat Exhaustion Caused by excessive loss of water and salt. Symptoms may include heavy sweating, weakness, dizziness, nausea, headache, diarrhea and muscle cramps.
Heat Fainting Caused by the loss of body fluids through sweating and by lowered blood pressure due to pooling of blood in the legs. Symptoms include temporary dizziness and fainting resulting from an insufficient flow of blood to the brain while a person is standing.
Heat Cramps Caused by a salt imbalance resulting from a failure to replace salt lost through excessive sweating. Symptoms are sharp muscle pains.
Heat Rash A result of inflammation of clogged sweat glands and accompanied by tiny red spots on the skin, which may give a prickling sensation.
Heat Edema Heat-induced swelling frequently noticeable in the ankles, feet and hands, and most often seen in people who are not regularly exposed to heat

 

 

Who is Most at Risk?

  • Infants and young children
  • Pregnant women
  • Older adults
  • People with certain chronic illnesses, such as breathing difficulties, heart conditions, or psychiatric illnesses
  • People under the influence of drugs or alcohol
  • People who have mobility constraints
  • People who work or exercise outside
  • People who are isolated, have low income or are homeless
  • Newcomers to Canada and tourists

Where Can I Go To Cool Down?

During Heat Warnings or Extreme Heat Warnings participating service providers in Haldimand and Norfolk counties will provide designated sites and recreational activities to help you cool down. A list of locations and services can be found below.

 

Stay COOL at these Facilities  

Norfolk County Cooling Centres

 

Norfolk County Public Libraries 

Branches in: Delhi, Port Dover, Port Rowan, Simcoe and Waterford

Visit olc.ncpl.ca  to view individual branch locations and hours.

 

 

Free Recreational Services in Norfolk County to Help You Beat the Heat

 

Pools

Please be advised, pool admittance is subject to bather load restrictions and available staffing levels.  Users may have to wait to be admitted when the pool experiences a high level of bathers.  Swim Admission Standard will be in effect.

Annaleise Carr Aquatic Centre

182 South Drive, Simcoe

519-426-8866 ext. 2233

Open Monday – Thursday 12 – 8 p.m.

Friday 12 – 7 p.m.

(Please note that for July 19, the pool is open 12 – 4 p.m. and 5 – 7 p.m.)

Saturday 12 – 2p.m. Closed Sunday.

Delhi Kinsmen Pool

336 Talbot Road, Delhi
519-582-0421
Open Monday – Friday 12 – 8 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday 12 – 3 p.m.

(Closed for public use July 20)

Splash Parks
Simcoe Kinsmen Splash Park

281 Head Street North, Simcoe

519-426-8866 ext. 2226

Open daily, 12 – 9 p.m

Delhi Splash Park

336 Talbot Road, Delhi

519-582-0421

Open daily, 12 – 8 p.m.

Arenas (Skating)
Simcoe Recreation Centre Arena

182 South Drive, Simcoe

519-426-8866 ext. 2226

Open daily, 12 – 8 p.m.

 

Haldimand County Cooling Centres

Haldimand County Public Libraries 

Caledonia Branch – Check branch hours and address

Cayuga Branch – Check branch hours and address

Dunnville Branch – Check branch hours and address

Hagersville Branch – Check branch hours and address

Jarvis Branch  – Check branch hours and address

Selkirk Branch  – Check branch hours and address

 

Free Recreational Services in Haldimand County to Help You Beat the Heat

 

Pools

Please be advised, pool admittance is subject to bather load restrictions and available staffing levels.  Users may have to wait to be admitted when the pool experiences a high level of bathers.  Swim Admission Standard will be in effect.

Caledonia Lions Pool

25 Caithness Street W., Caledonia

905-765-2676

Open Monday – Friday  1 – 4 p.m,

Saturday & Sunday – 1 – 5 p.m.

Dunnville Lions Pool

640 Lock Street W., Dunnville

905-774-7165

Open Monday – Friday  1 – 4 p.m,

Saturday & Sunday – 1 – 5:30 p.m.

Hagersville Lions Pool

13 Laidlaw Street, Hagersville

905-768-1730

Open Monday – Friday  1 – 4 p.m,

Saturday & Sunday – 1 – 5 p.m.

Splash Parks

Caledonia Lions Splash Pad

25 Caithness Street W., Caledonia

905-765-2676

Open Daily 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

 *Free services for Haldimand County residents only.  Proof of residence in Haldimand County required.

 

What Else Can I Do to Prevent Heat Related Illnesses?

The HNHU recommends taking the following actions to stay cool and prevent heat-related illness:

  • Drink plenty of cool liquids, especially water, before feeling thirsty.
  • Wear loose-fitting, light-coloured clothing made of breathable fabric.
  • Take cool showers or baths until you feel refreshed.
  • Take a break from the heat by spending a few hours in a cool place.
  • Block sun out by closing awnings, curtains or blinds during the day.
  • If you must be outdoors, avoid sun exposure by staying in the shade; wear a wide-brimmed, breathable hat or use an umbrella.
  • If you are taking medication or have a health condition, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it increases your health risk in the heat and follow their recommendations.
  • Plan outdoor activities during cooler parts of the day (in the early morning or evening).
  • Never leave people or pets in your care inside a parked vehicle or in direct sunlight.
  • Frequently visit neighbours, friends and older family members, especially those who are chronically ill, to make sure that they are cool and hydrated.

 

Other Weather Warnings

Other local weather warnings (such as air quality or thunderstorms) can be found on the Environment and Climate Change Canada.